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Niche Neighborhoods & Economic Diversity Drive Austin to Top in Emerging Trends in Real Estate® 2017

Secondary Markets such as Columbus and Richmond Quietly on the Rise in New PwC, Urban Land Institute Study

Niche neighborhoods and economic diversity are driving forces behind the strong showing of this year's top ten U.S. cities, according to Emerging Trends in Real Estate® 2017, released by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI). Austin, Texas, wins "Top City," thanks to its authentic, niche neighborhoods and depth of economic diversity, from manufacturing to education, health care and technology. Construction labor shortages and the rapid spread of digitization throughout the industry are also playing key roles in fueling 2017 real estate trends, along with "Optionality," the multi-purposing of in-demand spaces.


Obama Administration Names Final Round of Promise Zone Communities

Nine new Promise Zones join 13 others to expand economic opportunity in distressed areas

The Obama Administration named the final nine Promise Zones across the country - high poverty areas in select urban, rural and tribal communities. Through the Promise Zone Initiative, the Federal government will work strategically with local leaders to boost economic activity and job growth, improve educational opportunities, reduce crime and leverage private investment to improve the quality of life in these vulnerable areas.


USDA Awards More Than $14.5 Million to Support Plant Health and Resilience Research

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) awarded more than $14.5 million in grants to support research into plant health, production and resilience. These grants were made through the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) Foundational program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill and administered by USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).


Six Common City-Level Energy Policies Could Reduce Nationwide Carbon Emissions by up to 480 Million Metric Tons Annually

NREL report helps policymakers understand the comparative and collective impact of city energy policies

The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently examined the carbon abatement potential of city actions in six policy areas as part of the DOE's Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) project. The analysis uses new data on energy use in more than 23,400 U.S. cities and estimates the aggregate impact of city actions related to: building energy codes, public transit, building energy incentives, rooftop photovoltaics, smart growth, and municipal actions. The results indicate that by 2035, these six common city-level policy approaches could reduce nationwide carbon emissions by 210-480 million metric tons of carbon emissions per year. That is a 7-19 percent reduction in carbon emissions for the average city relative to current city-level emissions.


Third Annual Green Building Adoption Index Shows Almost 40 Percent of U.S. Office Space “Green” Certified

Institutional owners of office buildings continued to pursue green building certifications in the 30 largest U.S. markets during 2015. Continuing an upward trend over the past decade, green certifications are now held by 11.8 percent of all surveyed buildings, representing 39.6 percent of all office space. Both figures are slightly above last year’s results, according to the third annual Green Building Adoption Index study by CBRE Group, Inc. and Maastricht University. “Green” office buildings in the U.S. are defined as those that hold either an EPA ENERGY STAR label, USGBC LEED certification or both.


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